IELTS Speaking Part 1 | Do you like the neighbourhood you live in?

Suggested Answer:

Yes, I do.1 It’s not the most happening place in the world,2 but it’s perfect for a young family as it’s got3 everything we need.4

Notes:

1 – I always advise students to answer Part 1 questions in two parts:

i) Answer the questions
ii) Provide extra (relevant) information

This strategy could involve talking for two sentences; it could also involve talking for five. However, to avoid the temptation of waffling off-topic, I think it’s a great idea to get the exact answer to the question out straight away. This often involves very short, simple sentences that let the examiner know you understood the question. For example:

How well do you know the people who live next door to you? To be honest, I don’t know them at all. I’ve only ever …
Where would you go to buy flowers? I’d probably go to the supermarket. Although there’s a florist near my house, …

2(A) happening place is an informal phrase used to describe an area that has lots of things to do. The word place can be replaced with other similar nouns, such as city or town.

He likes his hometown because it’s a happening place.
The area we stayed in wasn’t really a happening place.
I used to live in Itaewon, which is one of the most happening neighbourhoods in Seoul.

3 It’s got is short for it has got. Native speakers often use this phrase when speaking (NEVER use this in an essay) simply to mean it has. You can also use this for other subjects.

I‘ve got a new phone. = I have a new phone.
She‘s got two legs. = She has two legs.
Milan‘s got a beautiful cathedral. = Milan has a beautiful cathedral.

Note how we almost always abbreviate the verb to have when using it in conjunction with got.

4 – I normally post longer suggested answers, but I threw this one in as a reminder that YOUR ANSWERS SHOULD BE DIFFERENT LENGTHS. There is no set formula (“All Part 1 answers must be 2 sentences“). Treat IELTS Speaking like a regular conversation in your native language rather than trying to stick to a rigid blueprint.

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